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20110731
20110731
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for npr or pbs have to have enough money so that they do not have to go to work in the summer. i used to hold an elevator -- i used to work at an elevator factory. i would tell my professors that is what i did over the summer, and there would be a horrible chortle. i once worked in the copper wire factory. i need money to pay for school. now with the internship thing, it is remarkable. i wanted to say that the intern's i have been working with, they are really concerned about things like student debt. one of them said they call it financial aid, but it is a 7% non-negotiable loan. they do not have that gap year anymore. a lot of them are borrowed to the hilt. did they come out and they cannot play around. they cannot make a movie. they cannot go to europe. they cannot have fun for a year before they enter the workplace or even experiment with what they want to do. >> we're going to have some station identification, particularly for our listeners on sirius xm radio. this program can be seen of theide on the station's government network, voice of america. and on 300 american stations pu
into radio instead of television, and she became an npr reporter, and her beat was covering this dispute that scooter libby/jude at this time miller thing. and i remember hearing one of her reports on the radio, i think it was after libby was convicted of perjury and the other fences, and she said that's what happened to louis libby. this is libby lewis reporting. [laughter] anyway, judy miller who had been subpoenaed by a grand jury that was investigating who the source of the leak of the identity of valerie plame was. valerie plame was an undercover cia agent, and her identity was leaked after her husband had debunked the administration's claim that saddam hussein was seeking nuclear material this africa. in africa. the court refused to hear the case in 2005 and left miller in jail. that was a big story because everybody had anticipated that the court would clarify and needed to clarify the extent to which reporters are able to protect their confidential sources. but in the miller case it was a disi ponte -- disappointing nondecision, just a refusal to take the case. the only case that
to talk radio any more. npr may be. you filter your sources and surround yourself with people who are your fellow conservatives. libertarians or whatever we are borg you -- everything gets filtered through that. because we are so tribal we also feel good about this like we are right and they are wrong. not that we are right. we are morally right and we are better than them and everybody does this. including scientist. every scientist would love for his eerie to be true. it is how you advance your career and how you move up the academic ladder and you have made an important discovery. so of course, scientists are going to be usually subject to do the confirmation bias. i guess we will talk about bias in science. is a problem, but it is a bigger problem in all the other areas of life religion, politics, economics and social attitudes because it leaves science has a systematic way of getting out the truth and trying to avoid those kinds of cognitive biases. it is not perfect but if you don't look for your disconfirming evidence i can assure you somebody else will usually with great glee in a
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3